SCAT

 
 

SCAT is a free enrichment program designed to expose rising 6th grade girls to game design.  The program spans three years, and participants will be able to develop their algorithmic thinking and problem solving skills as they design more and more complex games. 


The SCAT program consists of three different activities:

  1. 1. a 2-week hands-on game design summer camp

    (to be held July 1 - 12, 2013)

  1. 2. three 6-week intensive game design workshops where SCAT Scholars will refine and implement their games to prepare them for submission to three different national game design competitions

  2. 3.three field trips in the metro-Atlanta area where SCAT Scholars can see algorithms in action


As a SCAT Scholar, each year your child will:


  1. -   design and build a 2D or 3D game using Scratch,     

     GameMaker, Alice, and/or Unity

  1. -    submit their games to national game design

      competitions

  1. -   receive feedback about their games from    

      professional game designers

  1. -    visit locations in the metro-Atlanta area where 

       algorithms are used to solve real-world problems  

      (e.g., Georgia Tech Aware Home, Delta Airlines,

      SCAD Atlanta, Morehouse School of Medicine)


SCAT Scholars will receive $500 for each year they participate in the three year program.  Participation is limited to 26 girls. Priority will be given to African-American applicants.


The SCAT Program will kick off with the 2-week game design summer camp to be held Monday - Friday from

July 1, 2013 - July 12, 2013

in the Science Center on the campus of Spelman College from 9am - 3pm


Image credit: 123RF Stock Photo

Please click on the ‘Apply for the SCAT Program’ link for eligibility requirements and to apply to participate in the 3-year SCAT Program.

Welcome to SCAT

This research is funded by the National Science Foundation. DRK-12 Proposal 1150098 - CAREER: Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) - Exploring the development of computational algorithmic thinking in African-American middle school girls.